Business Programming
Warrington College of Business, University of Florida


Business Systems I 

  Instructor: Anurag Agarwal, 2008

Course Description:

The major goal of this course is to learn the basics of systems analysis and design. Modern businesses need information systems to support their business processes. Whether one opts for custom application development, or off-the-shelf information systems, it is important to understand the particular needs of a business to deliver a solution tailored to its requirements. The specification of a business’ information needs is a non-trivial and complex task, and is hardly an exact science. Fortunately, several tools exist that can guide the modern systems analyst in this job. This course introduces the systems analysis and design process, and the various tools that have been traditionally used to come up with the specification of the information needs of a business (or a business division) that drives the development of the particular information system(s).


Intermediate Business Programming 

  Instructor: Anurag Agarwal, 2008

Course Description:

This course is designed to teach Java as a tool for business system implementation. The emphasis of the course is on programming constructs and object-oriented concepts. The tentative list of topics that will be covered in this course are: [1] Basic Programming concepts - variables, arrays, control structures (if statements, select statement, loops), procedures (subroutines and functions), [2] Object-oriented concepts - classes and objects, encapsulation, inheritance, polymorphism [3] Graphical User Interface – controls and event-driven programming


Business Database Systems II

  Instructor: Selwyn Piramuthu, 2008

Course Description:

The availability of vast amounts of searchable data is changing the nature of the learning required to succeed in traditional business disciplines such as finance, accounting, and marketing. It is vital that future managers – from all majors – have a working knowledge of database, practical experience in its use, and management perspectives on how database is used to reshape products, services, and organizations. This class will focus on three broad issues: [1] relational algebra, the foundation of SQL, [2] Advanced database implementation, such as indexes, views, and triggers and [3] data mining (introductory level). While students are introduced to the practical business uses of some technology tools (SQL in particular), the real value that students gain from comes from understanding the strategic possibilities inherent at the intersection of business and technology.